My Ancestral Connection to Christopher Lloyd

docbrown

Back in October of 2015, many noted the date October 21, 2015 because it was featured in the 1989 film Back to the Future Part II. It was on October 21, 2015 that Doc Brown, Marty McFly, and Marty’s girlfriend, Jennifer, arrive to help Marty and Jennifer’s children. The 2015 world depicted in the film featured hover boards, flying cars, and power lace Nike shoes, which many hoped would be a reality when 2015 rolled around. This box-office hit and now classic comedy stars Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd, Lea Thompson, and Thomas F. Wilson.

Recently I discovered an ancestral connection to Christopher Lloyd, who is an American actor best known for not only his role as Dr. Emmett “Doc” Brown in the Back to the Future trilogy, but also for his role as Jim Ignatowski in the television series Taxi. This discovery came when I learned that Lloyd’s mother, Ruth, was a Lapham, and that her family is descended from John Lapham (1635-1710) and his wife, Mary Mann (1640-1712). The following is a chart that shows the decent of both Christopher Lloyd (1938-) and my paternal grandmother, Margaret Ann (Lapham) Kernan (1936-2004), from John Lapham (1635-1710) and Mary Mann (1640-1712).

Christopher Lloyd’s Line: My Grandmother’s Line:
1 John Lapham (1635-1710) m. Mary Mann (1640-1712) 1 John Lapham (1635-1710) m. Mary Mann (1640-1712)
2 John Lapham Jr (1677-1748) m. Mary Russell (1683-1752) 2 Nicholas Lapham (1689-1758) m. Mercy Arnold (1701-1756)
3 Joshua Lapham (1721-1789) m. Hannah Sherman (1727-1797) 3 Solomon Lapham (1730-1800) m. Sylvia Lapham (1737-1805)
4 Nathan Lapham (1761-1846) m. Elizabeth Arnold (1759-1834/5) 4 Duty Lapham (1775-1846) m. Mary Colwell (1772-?)
5 Jesse Lapham (1788-1863) m. Elizabeth Griffith (1798-1878) 5 Benjamin Lapham (1807-1860) m. Cemantha Broadway (ca. 1813-1846)
6 Henry Griffith Lapham (1822-1888) m. Samantha Vail (1826-1905) 6 William B. Lapham (1838-1925) m. Emoline Pauline Reynolds (1844-1886)
7 Lewis Henry Lapham (1858-1934) m. Antoinette Dearborn (1861-1956) 7 Horace Irving Lapham (1869-1927) m. Annie Margaret Leishman
(1875-1951)
8 Ruth Lapham (1896-1984) m. Samuel R. Lloyd (1897-?) 8 Theodore A. Lapham (1910-1955) m. Alice Lucretia Wellin (1916-1985)
9 Christopher Allen Lloyd (1938-) 9 Margaret Ann Lapham (1936-2004) m. William Kernan (LIVING)

Based on the generations of descent from John Lapham (1635-1710) and his wife Mary Mann (1640-1712) listed above, my paternal grandmother, Margaret Ann (Lapham) Kernan (1936-2004), and Christopher Allen Lloyd (1938-) are 7th cousins. This makes Christopher Lloyd my 7th cousin, 2x removed.

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My Ancestral Connection to President George H.W. Bush

President George H.W. Bush

On June 12, 1924, eighty-nine years ago today, George Herbert Walker Bush (1924-), 41st President of the United States, was born in Milton, Norfolk Co., Massachusetts the second son of Prescott Sheldon Bush (1895-1972) and Dorothy Walker (1901-1992). George H.W. Bush served as the 41st President of the United States from 1989 to 1993, following the presidency of Ronald Reagan. Prior to serving as President, George H.W. Bush served as the 43rd Vice President of the United States from 1981 to 1989, Director of Central Intelligence from 1976 to 1977, United States Ambassador to the United Nations from 1971 to 1973, and Congressman in the U.S. House of Representatives from Texas’s 7th District from 1967-1971. During World War II, George H.W. Bush served in the U.S. Navy, earning the Distinguished Flying Cross, three Air Medals, and the Presidential Unit Citation. In 1945, George H.W. Bush married Barbara Pierce (1925-), with whom he had six children, one of which, George W. Bush (1946-), went on to become the 43rd President of the United States.

While researching my family history, I discovered that I have an ancestral connection to this former President of the United States. When I began researching the ancestry of my paternal grandmother, Margaret Anne Lapham (1936-2004), I researched a family that married into my Lapham branch, the Arnold family. As I dug deeper into this branch, I found my ancestral connection to George H.W. Bush, which was by my 11th great grandparents, Nicholas Arnold (1550-1622) m. Alice Gully (1553-1596). According to research on President Bush’s genealogy, Nicholas and Alice Arnold were the 9th great grandparents of his paternal grandmother, Flora (Sheldon) Bush (1872-1920). While researching my grandmother’s ancestry, I found that my grandmother’s 5th great grandfather, Nicholas Lapham (1689-1758), was married to Mercy Arnold (1701-1756), who was the great-great granddaughter of Nicholas and Alice Arnold.

The following is a chart that shows the decent of both George H.W. Bush (1924-) and my paternal grandmother, Margaret Ann (Lapham) Kernan (1936-2004), from Nicholas Arnold (1550-1622) and Alice Gully (1553-1596):

George H.W. Bush’s Line: My Grandmother’s Line:
1 Nicholas Arnold (1550-1622) m. Alice Gully (1553-1596) 1 Nicholas Arnold (1550-1622) m. Alice Gully (1553-1596)
2 William Arnold (1587-1676) m. Christian Peake (1583-1659) 2 Thomas Arnold (1599-1674) m. Phoebe Parkhurst (1612-1688)
3 Joanna Arnold (1616-1692) m. Zachariah Rhodes (1603-1668) 3 Richard Arnold (1642-1710) m. Mary Angell (1648-1690)
4 Mary Rhodes (1654-?) m. John Low (1651-1692) 4 John Arnold (1670-1756) m. Mary Mowry (1675-1742)
5 Mary Low (1671-1769) m. Ephraim Pierce Jr (1674-1772) 5 Mercy Arnold (1701-1756) m. Nicholas Lapham (1689-1758)
6 Mial Pierce (1692-1786) m. Judith Round (1687-1744) 6 Solomon Lapham (1730-1800) m. Sylvia Lapham (1737-1805)
7 Nathan Pierce (1716-1793) m. Lydia Martin (1718-1798) 7 Duty Lapham (1775-1846) m. Mary Colwell (1772-?)
8 Isaac Pierce (1763-1849) m. Anna Fitch (1763-1809) 8 Benjamin Lapham (1807-1860) m. Cemantha Broadway (ca. 1813-1846)
9 Levi Pierce (1797-1838) m. Betsey Slade Wheeler (1800-1881) 9 William B. Lapham (1838-1925) m. Emoline Pauline Reynolds (1844-1886)
10 Elizabeth Slade Pierce (1822-1901) m. Courtland Philip Livingston Butler (1813-1891) 10 Horace Irving Lapham (1869-1927) m. Annie Margaret Leishman
(1875-1951)
11 Mary Elizabeth Butler (1850-1897) m. Robert Emmet Sheldon (1845-1917) 11 Theodore A. Lapham (1910-1955) m. Alice Lucretia Wellin (1916-1985)
12 Flora Sheldon (1872-1920) m. Samuel Prescott Bush (1863-1948) 12 Margaret Ann Lapham (1936-2004) m. William Kernan (LIVING)
13 Prescott Sheldon Bush (1895-1972) m. Dorothy Walker (1901-1992)
14 George H.W. Bush (1924-) m. Barbara Pierce (1925-)

Based on the generations of descent from Nicholas Arnold (1550-1622) and his wife Alice Gully (1553-1596) listed above, my paternal grandmother, Margaret Ann (Lapham) Kernan (1936-2004), and George H.W. Bush (1924-) are 9th cousins, 2x removed. This makes George H.W. Bush (1924-) my 11th cousin.

Fearless Females Challenge: March 25 – Women and Children

The following post continues the month long Fearless Females Challenge by Lisa Alzo, author of The Accidental Genealogist blog, which is focused on “celebrating and honoring ‘fearless females’ in our family trees” to mark National Women’s History Month, which is the month of March, with a post responding to unique prompts for each day of the month. (Note: Because I started this challenge late, I will be continuing it beyond March 31.)

Prompt for March 25 — Tell how a female ancestor interacted with her children. Was she loving or supportive? A disciplinarian? A bit of both?

In general, my female ancestors for whom I know how they interacted with their children did so in more of a loving or supportive way, than as disciplinarians–a role that was usually held by my male ancestors. However, my female ancestors could certainly fill the role of disciplinarian if they had to.

My paternal grandmother, Margaret Ann (Lapham) Kernan (1936-2004), was not usually the disciplinarian, but certainly did not look the other way when her children (or grandchildren) did or said something she did not approve of. She was more subtle in her disapproval, however. More often than not, she turned to her husband to handle disciplining anyone who required it. From what I understand about her grandmother (my 2nd great grandmother), Anna Margaret (Leishman) Lapham (1875-1951), she was both loving and supportive, but as a deeply religious person whose husband was frequently away working, did not spoil her children by sparing the rod.

Horace & Anna Margaret Lapham Family: (Front Row) Nellie, holding her son James, Anna Margaret, Theodore, and Peggy. (Back Row) Wilbur, Charles, and Orville.
Horace & Anna Margaret Lapham Family: (Front Row) Nellie, holding her son James, Anna Margaret, Theodore, and Peggy. (Back Row) Wilbur, Charles, and Orville.

My maternal great grandmother, Irene Vera (Balla) Sebok (1913-2006) would discipline her children, grandchildren, and even great grandchildren if they did something she did not approve of, but she was also loving and supportive as well. I am told that her mother, Julia (Molnar) Balla (1885-1962), could be the typical sweet, loving and supportive mother and grandmother, but could also be a disciplinarian, so much so that her children and grandchildren knew not to act up around her.

Julia (Molnar) Balla with Grandson, Paul.
Julia (Molnar) Balla with Grandson, Paul.

From what I understand about my other maternal great grandmother, Goldia “Goldie” Mae (Worthington) Hamilton (1912-2006), she was almost always loving and supportive, as her husband always filled the role of disciplinarian. The image of Goldie that I have always been left with regarding her relationship with her children (with respect to discipline) was that she was a lot like Jane Darwell‘s role as Ma Joad in the film adaptation of The Grapes of Wrath, loving and supportive even (perhaps) to a fault.

Harry (far left) & Goldie (far right) Hamilton with Relatives. Goldie is holding a young girl, possibly a niece.
Harry (far left) & Goldie (far right) Hamilton with Relatives. Goldie is holding a young girl, possibly a niece.

Fearless Females Challenge: March 24 – Shared Traits

The following post continues the month long Fearless Females Challenge by Lisa Alzo, author of The Accidental Genealogist blog, which is focused on “celebrating and honoring ‘fearless females’ in our family trees” to mark National Women’s History Month, which is the month of March, with a post responding to unique prompts for each day of the month. (Note: Because I started this challenge late, I will be continuing it beyond March 31.)

Prompt for March 24 — Do you share any physical resemblance or personality trait with one of your female ancestors? Who? What is it?

I am told by family members that I share some physical resemblance to my paternal grandmother, Margaret Ann (Lapham) Kernan (1936-2004), and to other members of her family. I have fair skin, blonde hair, and green eyes (originally blue). I also share some resemblance to other members of my family, but they are all male.

As for personality traits, I share some with my maternal great grandmothers, Irene Vera (Balla) Sebok (1913-2006) and Goldia “Goldie” Mae (Worthington) Hamilton (1912-2006). My great grandmother Irene was notorious for being a “neat freak.” I have always been that way as well. Like her, I can get quite upset if someone makes a mess and doesn’t bother to clean it up. (It has always been interesting to me that my fraternal twin brother is the complete opposite.) I also inherited what some call the “worry gene” from my great grandmother Irene. She tended to worry about little and big things, and about her family members, which I have a tendency to do. Although I never got a chance to get to know her, I am told that my great grandmother Goldie loved to laugh, and always tried to find a reason to laugh, even in difficult moments, which is a trait I share with her.

Margaret (Lapham) Kernan, Irene (Balla) Sebok, and Goldie (Worthington) Hamilton
The Female Ancestors I Share Traits With (L-R): Margaret (Lapham) Kernan, Irene (Balla) Sebok, and Goldie (Worthington) Hamilton.

88 Years Ago Today

On April 8, 1925, eighty-eight years ago today, William B. Lapham (1838-1925), my 3rd great grandfather, died in Detroit, Wayne Co., Michigan  at the age of 86. According to his death certificate, William died at Delray Industrial Hospital in Detroit from a “laceration of throat,” which was ruled a “suicide due to illness” by the coroner.

Death Certificate of William B. Lapham
Death Certificate of William B. Lapham

From what I have been able to gather from military pension records, William’s health following his discharge from active service during the Civil War was chronically poor. He suffered from illnesses that appear consistent with prolonged exposure to swamps, which he spent a great deal of time in while serving in the 4th Michigan Infantry during their “mud marches” in Virginia. In his pension file, there are several affidavits from doctors and those that knew him testifying to his ill health. According to these records, William chronically suffered from lung disease that causee him to have a severe cough and spit up blood, chronic diarrhea and resulting hemorrhoids, dizziness, numbness of the feet and ankles, and later rheumatism and heart disease. These conditions stayed with him throughout his life after the Civil War and worsened with age.

Reviewing the death certificate does reveal some unexpected facts. First of all, it states that William was “widowed,” instead of married. William was married four times, and at the time of his death he was married to his fourth wife, Clara (Glacklin?) Bernatz (1859-1941), whom he married on September 13, 1911 in Windsor, Essex Co., Ontario, Canada. It is unclear why William’s death certificate states he was widowed, as there is no record of their divorce. In fact, Clara appears on both the 1930 and 1940 U.S. Census as “Clara Lapham” living in Detroit. When she died in 1941, she was buried under the name “Clara Lapham” in the same cemetery as William, with the burial expenses being paid by the military. Perhaps William’s marital status is an error, given the fact that the informant, a Ms. Spier, does not appear to be a relative, but rather a hospital employee. Why wasn’t Clara the informant? Perhaps she was too distort over William’s suicide, or perhaps she was away at the time of his death.

William B. Lapham with his Fourth Wife, Clara.
William B. Lapham with his Fourth Wife, Clara.

Following his death, William was buried in Woodmere Cemetery in Detroit, Wayne Co., Michigan on April 11, 1925. He has a military headstone. Unfortunately, his headstone reads “William A. Lapham” instead of “William B. Lapham.” According to Woodmere, this headstone is for the grave of William B. Lapham who was buried on April 11, 1925. I was told that mistakes frequently occur on headstones, including military ones.

Military Headstone of William B. Lapham, which reads "William A. Lapham," in Woodmere Cemetery
Military Headstone of William B. Lapham, which reads “William A. Lapham,” in Woodmere Cemetery

340 Years Ago Today

On April 6, 1673, three hundred and forty years ago today, John Lapham (ca. 1635-1710), my 8th great grandfather, married Mary Mann (ca. 1640-1712), the daughter of William Mann (ca. 1610-1650) and Frances Hopkins (1614-1699), at the Friend’s Meeting House in Newport, Providence, Rhode Island.

A page from Aldridge's Laphams in America (1953) showing the marriage date of John Lapham and Mary Mann.
A page from Aldridge’s Laphams in America (1953) showing the marriage date of John Lapham and Mary Mann.

Sources: Numerous sources show this date as the marriage date fo John Lapham and Mary Mann, including New England Marriages Prior to 1700 by Clarence A. Torrey and Elizabeth P. Bentley (Genealogical Publishing Company, 1985), The New England Historical & Genealogical Register and Antiquarian Journal, Vol. 18 (S.G. Drake, 1864), and Laphams in America (1953) by Bertha Bortle Beal Aldridge. They all, it should be noted, seem to be based on records of the Society of Friends. However, the original records of Newport were completely destroyed during the American Revolutionary War.

Fearless Females Challenge: March 20 – Elusive or Brick Wall Ancestor

The following post continues the month long Fearless Females Challenge by Lisa Alzo, author of The Accidental Genealogist blog, which is focused on “celebrating and honoring ‘fearless females’ in our family trees” to mark National Women’s History Month, which is the month of March, with a post responding to unique prompts for each day of the month. (Note: Because I started this challenge late, I will be continuing it beyond March 31.)

Prompt for March 20 — Is there a female ancestor who is your brick wall? Why? List possible sources for finding more information.

Anyone who undertakes to research their family history will inevitably run into brick walls. My research is no exceptions. I have several brick walls with immigrant ancestors, including female immigrant ancestors such as Martha Rose (Sheridan) Kiernan (ca. 1797-?), my 4th great grandmother, and Roza Mari (Peto) Sebok (1871-1937), my 2nd great grandmother. With these female ancestors the brick wall comes from difficulties tracing their line in other countries, which seems it will only change with an increase in access to records in these countries. In addition to these brick walls, I have two female ancestors that are brick walls in my ancestry. These brick walls, however, come from difficulties in tracing their line in the United States.

The first of these female ancestors is Cemantha (Broadway) Lapham (ca. 1813-1846), my 4th great grandmother. I know few facts with certainty about Cemantha. According to available accounts, Cemantha was born in about 1813 in New York and died in about 1846 in Springfield, Wayne Co., Michigan. These facts, however, have not been confirmed by records. The only confirmed record I have uncovered so far is Cemantha’s marriage to Benjamin Lapham (1807-1860) on May 17, 1834 in Cuyhoga Co., Ohio. Two records for this marriage shows Cemantha’s maiden name as either “Broadway” or “Bradway.” Research into these variations, and variations in spelling of her first name, have not revealed any clear matches. Presently, my only lead is a Broadway family that also ended up in Wayne Co., Michigan at the same time, which originated in Somerset, England. However, I have not been able to link Cemantha to them.

Benjamin Lapham and Cemantha Broadway Marriage Record
Benjamin Lapham and Cemantha Broadway Marriage Record

The second female ancestor I have that has become a brick wall is Lucretia “Lucy” (Catlin) Heldman (ca. 1829-1873), my 3rd great grandmother. As with Cemantha, I knew few facts about Lucretia, particularly prior to her marriage to Johann “John” Adam Heldman (ca. 1809-1883) on July 11, 1851 in Richland Co., Ohio. According to available records, Lucretia was born in about 1829 in either New York (according to the 1860 U.S. Census record), or Connecticut (according to the 1870 U.S. Census record), or  Massachusetts (according to the “Ohio Deaths and Burials, 1854-1997” Index). It is unclear why these three records differ regarding her birth location. The lack of clarity on this fact has made tracking her parents difficult. If she was born in New York, there is a Lucretia Catlin/Cotalin living in Chesterville, Morrow Co., Ohio in 1850 in the household of Dr. Moses De Camp. The De Camp family were living in Mansfield, Richland Co., Ohio in 1860 and 1870. It is, however, unclear if this my Lucretia or the Lucretia Catlin who married James F. Millard in 1862 and died in 1907 in Cuyahoga Co., Ohio. If she was born in Connecticut, there is a large number of Catlins in that state (particularly in Litchfield County), all of which seem to descend from Thomas Catlin (c1612-1690) who was from Kent, England, came to Hartford, Connecticut prior to 1646 and died there in 1690.

J.A. Heldman and Lucretia Catlin Marriage Record
J.A. Heldman and Lucretia Catlin Marriage Record

With both of these brick wall ancestors, I have a lot of research still to do; and hopefully I will uncover a lead that will turn out to be a breakthrough.

324 Years Ago Today

On April 1, 1689, three hundred and twenty-four years ago today, Nicholas Lapham (1689-1758), my 7th great grandfather, was born in Dartmouth, Bristol Co., Massachusetts the son of John Lapham (ca. 1635-1710) and Mary Mann (ca. 1640-1712).

Birth Record of Nicholas Lapham (1689-1758).
Birth Record of Nicholas Lapham (1689-1758). (Nicholas’s birth record is mentioned following that of his sister’s.)

Nicholas was the first in my line of my Lapham ancestors to have been born in America, his father having immigrated to the Massachusetts Bay Colony from Devonshire, England in 1660 aboard the Hercules.

(Source: “Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Vital and Towns Records, 1579-2001.” Images. FamilySearch. https://familysearch.org)

Fearless Females Challenge: March 18 – Shining Star

The following post continues the month long Fearless Females Challenge by Lisa Alzo, author of The Accidental Genealogist blog, which is focused on “celebrating and honoring ‘fearless females’ in our family trees” to mark National Women’s History Month, which is the month of March, with a post responding to unique prompts for each day of the month. (Note: Because I started this challenge late, I will be continuing it beyond March 31.)

Prompt for March 18 — Shining star: Did you have a female ancestor who had a special talent? Artist, singer, actress, athlete, seamstress, or other? Describe.

Although I have not yet found any female ancestor who was famous for her talents, I do have many women in my ancestry that were talented. Many of my female ancestors were very talented cooks, with many of their recipes being handed down for generations. This is particularly true for my maternal grandmother’s side of the family. My maternal grandmother, Alberta (Sebok) Hamilton (LIVING), her mother, Irene (Balla) Sebok (1913-2006), and her mother, Julia (Molnar) Balla (1885-1962) were all accomplished cooks, making all kinds of Hungarian dishes and desserts. This seems to have run in the family, given the fact that Julia’s sister, Elizabeth, was a professional chief in New York.

In addition to cooking, I have some female ancestors with artistic leanings. My paternal grandmother, Margaret Ann (Lapham) Kernan (1936-2004), was a talented artist. She enjoyed painting, particularly murals. In my grandparents home in California before they sold it, there was a large willow tree mural my grandmother painted. Sadly, no photos appear to exist of this. She also enjoyed drawing. I recall my father telling me that she drew portraits of several members of her family, including her mother. Additionally, several female ancestors were also talented in knitting, crocheting, and quilt/afghan making. My maternal great grandmother, Irene (Balla) Sebok (1913-2006), made many doilies, quilts or afghans, and other items. I have a few of them, including a pillow she made me.

I am not certain how many female ancestors in my ancestry were musically talented, but I do have at least one. My 2nd great grandmother, Lois Beatrice (Agee) Wellin (1897-1983), was talented at playing the piano, particularly the organ. She enjoyed playing for her family and guests at parties at their home in Portland, Oregon. I am told she loved to play songs like “Alley Cat” during these parties. 🙂

Although I already mentioned it in a previous post in this challenge, another talent of a female ancestor I uncovered is writing poetry. My 2nd great grandmother, Anna Margaret (Leishman) Lapham (1875-1951), wrote numerous Christian themed poems.

Fearless Females Challenge: March 17 – Social Butterfly?

The following post continues the month long Fearless Females Challenge by Lisa Alzo, author of The Accidental Genealogist blog, which is focused on “celebrating and honoring ‘fearless females’ in our family trees” to mark National Women’s History Month, which is the month of March, with a post responding to unique prompts for each day of the month.

Prompt for March 17 — Social Butterfly? What social organizations or groups did your mother or grandmother belong to? Sewing circle, church group, fraternal benefit society or lodge? Describe her role in the group.

While researching my family history, I have uncovered male ancestors involved in various social organizations, such as the Masons, the Elks, the Odd Fellows, etc. I have, however, found few female ancestors with records of involvement. I have had some that were involved in the Daughters of the American Revolution, though I am uncertain if they participated in any meetings. Apart from this, I do have some that were heavily involved in their churches. Apart from these. the closest I have found for my female ancestors include my paternal great grandmother, Alice Lucretia (Wellin-Lapham) Graber (1916-1985), and my maternal grandmother, Alberta (Sebok) Hamilton (LIVING).

My paternal great grandmother, Alice Lucretia (Wellin-Lapham) Graber (1916-1985), was employed during WWII as a welder for the Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation in Portland, Multnomah Co., Oregon. In addition to this, she was a member of the International Brotherhood of Boiler Makers, Iron Ship Builders and Helpers of America, which is a trade-union. Alice was initiated on October 1, 1943, and regularly payed her dues. While going through some items that belonged to her following the death of her daughter Marla, her membership and dues book was discovered. Presently, I do not know how actively involved Alice was apart from paying her dues, which was likely a required part of her employment as a welder.

Alice (Wellin-Lapham) Graber's International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers and Helpers of America Membership and Dues Book
Alice (Wellin-Lapham) Graber’s International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers and Helpers of America Membership and Dues Book

As for my maternal grandmother, Alberta (Sebok) Hamilton (LIVING), she was involved for many years with the Order of the White Shrine of Jerusalem, a Masonic social organization that was founded in 1893 and comprises both men and women. She joined this organization around the time her husband, Lee Hamilton, became a member of the Masons. Throughout her involvement with the organization, she served in the offices of Worthy Guide and Worthy Shepherdess in her local chapter.

Logo of The Order of the White Shrine of Jerusalem
Logo of The Order of the White Shrine of Jerusalem