A Clue to a Family History Mystery: Jacob Worthington’s Civil War Service

In researching my family history on my Mom’s side, I uncovered something that struck me as being a little unusual dealing with the Civil War service of one of my ancestors, Jacob Worthington (1839-1920). Recently, while using Google Books, I uncovered information that offers a significant clue for this family history mystery.

Jacob Worthington’s Headstone

Jacob Worthington (1839-1920), my 4th great grandfather, was born in 1839 in Lexington, Davidson Co., North Carolina, and he died in 1920 in Harrison, Boone Co., Arkansas. When I was first researching my Worthington branch, I discovered early on the location of Jacob’s burial, in Grubb Springs Cemetery in Harrison. Using the internet, I tracked down a photo of his headstone, and it was a military marker, which was inscribed “Jacob Worthington 19 IND. L.A.” Digging further, I uncovered that this inscription indicated that Jacob served during the Civil War, and that “19 IND. L.A.” stands for “19th Indiana Light Artillery.” Further digging revealed that Jacob had indeed served in the Civil War on the side of the Union; and that he did so in the 19th Independent Battery Indiana Light Artillery, which he was mustered in on August 20, 1862 at Indianapolis, Indiana.

To say the least, this surprised me—and I must admit made me feel relieved to know that one of my ancestors did not fight to keep slavery alive (simplifying the war I know). Still, it was not at all what I would have expected from a young man of about 23 living (I assumed) in Confederate territory (Arkansas). I was always told that Jacob was in Arkansas, and so I was left wondering what could explain this. For years I could not uncover why Jacob was in or went to Indiana. There was no Worthington connection to Indiana as far as I had uncovered or been told.

Page Mentioning Worthington and Indiana Connection

Searching through old books on Google Books has helped uncover many facts about some of my ancestors in the past. Recently, after turning my attention back to my Mom’s branches, I decided to try this search tool for Worthington, and I found something. According to a biography about Alson G. Bodenhamer, who married Jacob’s sister Esther in 1857, published in Portrait and Biographical Record of Johnson and Pettis Counties, Missouri (1895), Jacob and Esther’s father, Brooks Worthington, moved his family to Indianapolis, Indiana after leaving North Carolina and before moving to Missouri in 1840. As it turns out Brooks was a shoemaker in Indianapolis. Based on this new information, it seems highly likely that Jacob was not in Arkansas before the Civil War broke out, but was rather in Indiana or Missouri (he is enumerated on the 1850 U.S. Census in Missouri).

Although I have found no details of Jacob’s experiences during the war, the 19th Indiana Light Artillery saw a great deal of action, being a part of numerous battles, sieges, and campaigns. They were even a part of Sherman’s March to the Sea. Jacob was discharged on June 10, 1865 at Indianapolis, Indiana. Three days later, he married Elmina Couch (1846-1921) in Wayne Co., Indiana. Perhaps she ultimately explains why he was in Indiana, as it seems likely that they knew each other prior to the war—her family was also from North Carolina. By 1866, they were living in Lafayette Co., Missouri, and by 1880 they were in Boone Co., Arkansas.